Ancient lakes may have been refuges for early life

All life needs nitrogen to build essential molecules like proteins, RNA and DNA. And to acquire nitrogen, cells need molybdenum. But molybdenum is thought to have been very scarce in Mesoproterozoic oceans 1.6 billion to 1 billion years ago, potentially stalling the evolution and diversification of life in this period, which was then entirely microscopic. New research, however, is revealing that lakes during this time contained relatively high levels of molybdenum, suggesting life may have continued evolving in those settings.
 

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Lucas Joel

Lucas Joel was EARTH's 2015 summer intern.

Joel (www.lvjwriting.com) is a freelance science journalist. He has a master's in paleontology from the University of California, Riverside, and is currently based in Boulder, Colo. 

Tuesday, November 3, 2015 - 06:00