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Bringing geoscience to bear on the problem of abandoned mines

With 3 million gallons of acidic, heavy-metal-laden water behind an earthen plug at high elevation, Colorado’s Gold King Mine was, literally, a situation just waiting to go downhill. The blowout last August shone a spotlight on the larger problem of abandoned mine lands. What role do geoscientists play in solving it?

19 Jun 2016

Getting there and getting around Turkey

Turkey has two major airports — Istanbul and Ankara — and many smaller regional ones. Istanbul Ataturk Airport offers nonstop flights on Turkish Airlines from several U.S. cities, including New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Los Angeles and San Francisco. To enter the country, Americans need a visa; these can be quickly obtained online.

09 Jun 2016

Travels in Geology: Turkey's storied Turquoise Coast

Turkey’s Turquoise Coast — where the rugged Taurus Mountains meet the Mediterranean Sea — owes its breathtaking scenery to tectonic contortions that have created a landscape that is both spectacular and geographically complex. The many Mediterranean civilizations that have inhabited this coastline left behind an impressive legacy of ruins.
09 Jun 2016

Seeing the seafloor in high definition: Modern mapping offers increasing clarity on Earth's vast underwater landscape

Advancements in seafloor mapping technology have allowed us to see through the water with increasing coverage and resolution. But only a tiny fraction of the seafloor has ben mapped in high resolution, leaving vast expanses of the deep ocean virtually uncharted. 

31 May 2016

The most dangerous fault in America

Running through densely populated cities like Oakland, Fremont and Berkeley, Calif., and not far from San Francisco, San Jose and Silicon Valley is a dangerous fault that could rupture at any time. It’s known as the Hayward Fault, and when it goes, it will likely produce a devastating earthquake.

18 May 2016

Travels in Geology: Discovering Denver's dinosaurs

A rich paleontological legacy makes Denver, Colo., one of the best places in the world to learn about dinosaurs, with numerous fossils and trackways at sites nearby.

04 May 2016

Getting there and getting around Denver

Denver International Airport is the best arrival point for exploring Denver and the surrounding area. A car is necessary to see many of the attractions described here. If you fly in, you can rent a vehicle at the airport or take the new light rail into town and rent a car as needed. Although all of these sites are open year-round, snow sometimes obscures the tracks during winter and early spring, and trails can be muddy. May through October is an ideal time to visit the region.

04 May 2016

Reading the ridges: Are climate and the seafloor connected?

New research suggests that midocean ridge volcanoes respond to variations in sea level, potentially leaving topographic records of past glaciations in the form of abyssal hills. But could those volcanoes also influence the climate cycles that drive sea-level changes?

25 Apr 2016

Making tracks through the Dinosaur Diamond

The Dinosaur Diamond scenic byway is an 824-kilometer-long dinosaur fossil- and trackway-sightseeing extravaganza. Follow the route through Utah and Colorado to traverse the Late Triassic through the Cretaceous.

18 Apr 2016

Museums and exhibits in the Dinosaur Diamond

All around the Dinosaur Diamond area there are exiting museums and exhibits highlighting the area's rich paleontological history.

18 Apr 2016

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