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Getting there and getting around Zermatt

Zermatt, a car-free resort town at the foot of the Matterhorn, can be reached from major international airports in Geneva, Zürich or Milan. All three airports offer nonstop flights from several North American cities and have numerous rental-car agencies. Switzerland has four official languages, of which German and French are the most commonly used, but road signs are easily followed by English speakers, making it easy to navigate around the country. However, private cars are not allowed in Zermatt, so you might instead want to take one of the Swiss Rail Network’s clean and reliable trains to Zermatt, a 3.5-hour trip from Zürich or a four-hour trip from Geneva. If you do drive, you must park in a garage in Täsch, 5 kilometers north of the resort town, and take a train or taxi into town. The village itself is quite walkable; a 10-minute stroll will get you across town.

20 Jul 2016

Illustrating Geology: Great images that transformed the field

“The Map” is perhaps the single-most recognized depiction within geology, but it is just one of many historically transformative images in a field that relies heavily on illustration and visualization to help convey information and shape our understanding of the natural world.

17 Jul 2016

Travels in Geology: Sculptures of wind and ice: Sleeping Bear Dunes and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshores

Two of the U.S.’s four national lakeshores are in Michigan. Visit them both for a look at how an ice sheet drastically reshaped the landscape, eroding and carving dunes, cliffs and the Great Lakes.

07 Jul 2016

Legend of the Sleeping Bear

Sleeping Bear Dunes gets its name from a Chippewa legend that tells the story of a mother bear and her two cubs who, fleeing a fire in the woods of Wisconsin on the other side of Lake Michigan, plunged into the lake and began swimming to find safe haven.

07 Jul 2016

'P' is for phosphate: Could urine solve a fertilizer shortage?

Phosphorus is essential to plant growth, but there’s a looming shortage, which could leave global agriculture without the fertilizer needed to feed growing populations. Some scientists think, with some tweaks to our sanitation system, human urine could be mined for the necessary phosphorus.

26 Jun 2016

Take a stand (or sit) for better water quality management

The average person urinates four to seven times over a 24-hour period, producing about 1.5 liters of urine per day. Here are some things you can do today to help conserve water, improve water quality, and keep all that waste from going to waste.

 
26 Jun 2016

Bringing geoscience to bear on the problem of abandoned mines

With 3 million gallons of acidic, heavy-metal-laden water behind an earthen plug at high elevation, Colorado’s Gold King Mine was, literally, a situation just waiting to go downhill. The blowout last August shone a spotlight on the larger problem of abandoned mine lands. What role do geoscientists play in solving it?

19 Jun 2016

Travels in Geology: Turkey's storied Turquoise Coast

Turkey’s Turquoise Coast — where the rugged Taurus Mountains meet the Mediterranean Sea — owes its breathtaking scenery to tectonic contortions that have created a landscape that is both spectacular and geographically complex. The many Mediterranean civilizations that have inhabited this coastline left behind an impressive legacy of ruins.
09 Jun 2016

Getting there and getting around Turkey

Turkey has two major airports — Istanbul and Ankara — and many smaller regional ones. Istanbul Ataturk Airport offers nonstop flights on Turkish Airlines from several U.S. cities, including New York, Chicago, Atlanta, Los Angeles and San Francisco. To enter the country, Americans need a visa; these can be quickly obtained online.

09 Jun 2016

Seeing the seafloor in high definition: Modern mapping offers increasing clarity on Earth's vast underwater landscape

Advancements in seafloor mapping technology have allowed us to see through the water with increasing coverage and resolution. But only a tiny fraction of the seafloor has ben mapped in high resolution, leaving vast expanses of the deep ocean virtually uncharted. 

31 May 2016

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