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Protecting the mineral treasures of Antarctica's Larsemann Hills

In 2003, scientists visited the Stornes Peninsula in Antarctica's Larsemann Hills to study the rocks — especially boron and phosphorus minerals. What they found set them on a decade-long path to protect the geology, culminating in 2014 with the naming of the site as an Antarctic Specially Protected Area.

19 Jan 2015

The amazing minerals of the Larsemann Hills

Four minerals were discovered on Stornes Peninsula in the Larsemann Hills of East Antarctica based on fieldwork there from 2003 to 2004. In part because of these minerals and other rare boron and phosphate minerals found in this pristine region, Stornes Peninsula is now protected as an Antarctic Specially Protected Area — the highest level of environmental protection in Antarctica. Below are some details about these special minerals.

19 Jan 2015

Travels in Geology: Navigating the rocks, reefs and waters of Bermuda

Picturesque beaches, beautiful weather and a pleasant mix of Caribbean and British cultures make Bermuda a popular tourist destination, especially in the winter. But it's also a place where geology and history are on full display. 

16 Jan 2015

Getting there and getting around Bermuda

Several major airlines serve Bermuda’s L.F. Wade International Airport, located on St. David’s Island about 30 minutes from Bermuda’s capital and largest city, Hamilton. Dozens of bus routes can take passengers to almost any place on the island, but getting to and from the airport — or anywhere with large suitcases — on the bus is frowned upon. Instead, take a taxi. Rental cars are not available to visitors. The alternative is scooters, but nerves of steel and good health insurance are a must for navigating the narrow, windy, high-speed roads. And although the island is small — less than two-thirds the size of Manhattan — and many places are within walking distance, few roads outside Hamilton have sidewalks or even shoulders. A handful of ferry routes can also help you reach some destinations.

16 Jan 2015

A dry and ravaged land: Investigating water resources in Afghanistan

Decades of war, loss of hydrological knowledge, climate change and a growing population all threaten Afghanistan’s water supply, but the U.S. Geological Survey is working with the Afghanistan Geological Survey and other partners to establish safe and reliable supplies of water for now and well into the future. 

04 Jan 2015

Geocorps America: Putting geoscientists to work on federal lands

GeoCorps America has been putting geoscience students, recent graduates, and professional and retired geoscientists to work on short-term projects on federal lands since 1997. Today, GeoCorps encompasses projects in more than 60 national parks, 15 national forests and 15 public lands; and it is still growing.

18 Dec 2014

Into the parks: A sampling of GeoCorps projects

Applications are now being accepted for spring and summer 2015 GeoCorps America positions. The deadline is Feb. 3 at noon (Mountain Time). Fall and winter positions will be posted on May 1, with an application deadline of noon on July 1. Applicants may apply for up to three positions (although they can only accept one) and must be a member of the Geological Society of America to apply. Below is a sampling of some GeoCorps projects.

18 Dec 2014

Try and try again: GeoCorps application tips

The competition for GeoCorps America positions has been getting stiffer each year as the number of applicants increases. Last year, the program received more than 1,400 applications for 136 summer positions.

18 Dec 2014

Getting there and getting around France's Massif Central

Most flights to France from the U.S. land in Paris. If you are heading directly to the Massif Central, you can either take a one-hour flight from Paris to Clermont-Ferrand Auvergne Airport or take the Corail Auvergne train, a 3.5-hour trip. 

16 Dec 2014

The geology of Middle-earth

The first time filmmaker Peter Jackson read J.R.R. Tolkien, he was 18 years old and riding a train across the North Island of his native New Zealand. Whenever Jackson glanced out the train’s window, he was struck by how much the passing landscape resembled his imagined picture of Tolkien’s mythical realm of Middle-earth. This revelation stuck with him; two decades later, Jackson chose New Zealand as the backdrop for his blockbuster film adaptation of the entire “The Lord of the Rings” trilogy, and again later when filming “The Hobbit” series.

15 Dec 2014

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