Twitter icon
Facebook icon
RSS icon
YouTube icon

dinosaur

Travels in Geology: Exploring Connecticut's Ancient Rift Valley

Fifty years ago, a bulldozer operator in Connecticut discovered one of the largest dinosaur tracksites in North America, now preserved at Dinosaur State Park. The formation of the tracksite, which lies in the remnant of a Triassic rift valley, is linked with the demise of the supercontinent Pangea. 

17 Feb 2015

Getting there and getting around Connecticut's ancient Rift Valley

Central Connecticut is easily accessible via major roads and flights into Hartford’s Bradley International Airport. The region is well equipped with rental cars, hotels, restaurants and everything else a traveler could need.  The website www.ctvisit.com has maps and more details on all of the attractions listed here, as well as lodging, food and other activities.

 
17 Feb 2015

Crumbly amber holds dinosaur secrets

In the movie “Jurassic Park,” dinosaurs were resurrected from DNA in blood harvested from Mesozoic mosquitoes preserved in amber. The plot was pure science fiction, but a new study has found another use for the biological material trapped in fossilized tree resin. By studying microscopic inclusions of plant material, pollen and feathers preserved in bits of amber recovered alongside dinosaur fossils, paleontologist Ryan McKellar of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Canada is recreating a more complete picture of the Mesozoic landscape.

 
12 Feb 2015

Stegosaur's tail packed a lethal punch

With their big lumbering bodies and plates of armor, stegosaurs can be likened to the modern-day rhinoceros. Both are primarily peaceful plant eaters, but you wouldn’t want to make either of them mad. Now, paleontologists have uncovered evidence of a casualty of stegosaurian combat: a predatory allosaur with a lethal conical wound the size and shape of a stegosaur tail spike.

07 Feb 2015

New species of titanosaurus discovered in Tanzania

The Cretaceous landscape was dominated by huge herbivorous sauropods, the largest land animals ever to walk the planet. Fossils from many of these massive creatures have been unearthed around the world, but the recent discovery of a new specimen of titanosaurus in Tanzania is among the first sauropods found on the African continent.

14 Jan 2015

All dinosaurs may have had feathers

Since the first feathered dinosaur was discovered in China in 1996, more and more feathered theropod specimens have been found. Now, a new nontheropod fossil found in Siberia and described in Science suggests that all species of dinosaurs may have had feathers.

01 Jan 2015

Polar dino tracks show full ecosystem

Researchers recently uncovered a new dinosaur tracksite in Alaska’s Denali National Park. The well-preserved Late Cretaceous footprints were left by duck-billed dinosaurs called hadrosaurs. Most of the tracks are incredibly detailed, and some even show some skin impressions; they represent animals of various ages. Given the wealth of data, the tracks provide insight into the herd dynamics and paleobiology of the greenhouse-world Arctic.

28 Nov 2014

Geologic Column: How T. rex got its street cred back

Apparently, T. rex was in danger of losing its street cred as the scariest meat-eating hunter of all time. Until a recent discovery, the lumbering giant was being dissed as a sneaky scavenger. Forensic paleontologists to the rescue!

16 Aug 2014

Geomedia: 'Dinosaur 13' chisels away at the story behind discovery of Sue

The famous Tyrannosaurus rex "Sue" made headlines in the early 1990s, not only for being the most complete T. rex skeleton ever found, but also for the human drama that unfolded after the discovery. The story is the focus of a new documentary, "Dinosaur 13."

15 Aug 2014

Pompeii-like eruption fossilized dinosaurs in death poses

In A.D. 79, Mount Vesuvius erupted in Italy, burying the town of Pompeii and entombing its citizens in ash, which preserved their death poses for thousands of years. In northern China, a similar fate seems to have befallen dinosaurs, mammals and early birds. A new study, published in Nature Communications, sheds light on the preservation history of the Jehol Biota — an ancient ecosystem dating to between 130 million and 120 million years ago.

20 Jul 2014

Pages