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Comment: The Oso landslide shows need for insurance and better planning

The deadly landslide that struck near Oso, Wash., in March killed more than 40 people and caused tens of millions of dollars in damage, most of which was not covered by insurance. The landslide was not a surprise to geologists. Could this disaster have been prevented — or can future disasters be prevented?

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Scott Burns

Scott Burns

Burns is emeritus professor of geology at Portland State University in Portland, Ore. He is also past president of the Association of Environmental and Engineering Geologists and has testified in dozens of landslide legal cases. The views expressed are his own.

Tuesday, May 6, 2014 - 03:30

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