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Supernova explosion detected in Early Pleistocene sediments

When a massive star comes to the end of its life cycle, it goes out with a spectacular bang known as a supernova. Only three of these events have been observed in the Milky Way in the past 1,000 years. Evidence for older explosions can be detected in the form of rare elements found on Earth that are only produced by such explosions.

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Mary Caperton Morton

Mary Caperton Morton

Morton is a freelance writer and photographer (and EARTH roving correspondent) who makes her home on the back roads of North America, living and working out of a tiny solar-powered Teardrop camper. Follow her travels at www.theblondecoyote.com.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017 - 06:00

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